No Kincora prosecutions but hopes for a public inquiry (26.05.83)

Community Care, 26th May 1983

CC260583

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  1. Kate MacDonald said:

    Transcript:

    NO KINCORA PROSECUTIONS BUT HOPES FOR A PUBLIC INQUIRY (Community Care, 26th May 1983)

    Hopes for a public judicial inquiry into the Kincora scandal were raised by BASW this week, with the announcement by the Director of Public Prosecutions that no further prosecutions would be made.
    BASW general secretary John Cypher told Community Care: “This is good news, leaving the merits of the decision aside, as it now enables the various interests involved to go to the Government again, and press for the public inquiry promised by Northern Ireland Secretary James Prior over a year ago.”
    The DPP’s decision comes after several months of study of a report by the Royal Ulster Constabulary. The DPP formally discounts charges that boys at the Kincora boys’ home in Belfast had been part of a homosexual vice-ring in the early seventies. But it confirms that former housemaster William McGrath, who made repeated homosexual assaults on the boys, was used by military intelligence.
    A confidential private inquiry into the scandal collapsed in February last year, following the resignation of three of its members on the grounds of “major criminal aspects of the case still outstanding”.
    The three members who resigned were Professors Norman Tutt, Olive Stevenson and Dr Stanley Worrall.
    The collapse was followed by an announcement by Mr Prior of a public inquiry, to be headed by a High Court judge, but which would not start until police investigations into the affair had been completed.
    In a debate in March this year, the Northern Ireland Assembly unanimously approved a motion calling on the Secretary of State to make an “early announcement” of a date for judicial inquiry. BASW continues to express concern over the delays.
    Mr Cypher said: “The DPP’s decision is not the end of the day. There will now be another inquiry, and this must be the opportunity to discover what has gone wrong in the way people are recruited into residential homes, and how residential care in Northern Ireland should operate.

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